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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have three neon tetras in my 10 gal tank and the males are getting very aggressive fighting over the female lately. I think they're going to spawn pretty soon. However, if I have a siamese algea eater in the tank, do you think he will steal the eggs since neon tetras don't guard their nest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've always heard about how hard it is to spawn neon tetras but I just want to try before I give up. I've been providing all sort of "romantic" environment for them like black background, low light, lots of plants, higher temp (78F)...etc. I think I really got a shot. :wink: At one point, the female got very plump and her belly shrink quite abit on the next day. Her fins are beaten up quite badly also. I assume this is from the spawning process when the male got too rough on her.
By the way, I have another 4 pigmy cories in the tank. I'm abit concern they will eat the eggs also since they're always sniffing around for food. Any advice are welcome.
 

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If you have never bred any tetras or barbs, I suggest you try the easier ones first. No eggs will survive in any tank where there are more than the spawning fish. She expels her eggs, the male follows and ferilizes them and everybody else follows them and eats the eggs before they reach the gravel. Any not eaten will be devoured by the cories. Unless you water hardness is almost "0" they wouldn't be any good any way. Sorry.
 

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Your little pygmy corydoras are the ones prone to spawn rather easily, if both sex is present! :D

Again, neontetras are schooling fish and should be kept in groups of at least 6-8 specimen. Poor only lady may become a bit worn out by the two males, too. Often neons spawn spontaniously if kept in good conditions but it is really hard to save the eggs from being eaten.
You could prepare a spawning tank with very dense vegetation on bottom (and preferably marbles underneath them) and put the females and some males in there in the evening, they might spawn at break of dawn, so soon after it take them away. Soon you will see whether they spawned and whether some eggs remained uneaten, if there is hatching fry. First offer them infusoria, later newly hatched brine shrimp.
 

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Like everyone else said neons are notoriously hard to breed. I've had some breed before but they are in a larger community tank and the community isn't nice to unguarded eggs. Even if they breed (you have a small school so i'm guessing they are too stressed to breed) they won't hatch and if they do miraculously, then they will be devoured.
 
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