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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So this is my first time with driftwood. So I have two different things for your comments. I noticed that the driftwood at the pet store is very heavy and driftwood I find at the lake isn't very heavy. First what makes driftwood, Driftwood? and second I just ordered some off eBay, will this just sink to the bottom or I've heard people say it might need to be water logged first. what does it mean and how do I do it?

Thanks,
First timer.:fun:
 

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Perfect Water - BÖC
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I don't know, but I may as well be the one to remind you to boil all new driftwood. Welcome to FF!!! :D
 

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Darth Plecostamus
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If it floats it will need to be weighted down and held underwater until the wood absorbs enough water it will sink. During this period it will also release tannins with will stain the water yellowish. It's not a bad look in some aquariums imo. Depending on the size you can just soak it in a bucket for a week or two. Change the water every time it starts turning color till it stops if you don't want it to cloud your tank. It can take months for the wood to stop releasing them.
 

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It really just depends on the particular type of the wood. If it's a dense wood, it won't take long to waterlog, since there isn't much air in it anyway, but if it's something like Balsa or Sandal wood, it'll take much longer because there's a lot more pores filled with air that need to be filled with water :p . I hope this is accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok yeah I just put it in there and as I thought it would.

But what exactly does boiling it do because I have always heard that. One piece is very dnse and heavy so I am guessing it won't take long but the others might take a little longer.

And one more question does the merky color that the wood causes, will it hurt the fish?
 

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Boiling is supposed to help that murkyness leave the wood. Also, if you found the wood in the wild, I would suggest boiling it anyways to kill anything nasty that might be living on or in it.

In a sense, it's kinda like steeping tea. You put the tea leaves in boiling water, and colour, scent, and flavour are released from the leaves into the water, and if you use a bag of tea leaves more than once, you'll get more and more diluted tea, until it's more like just hot water. You can take this whole paragraph and apply it to Driftwood. Interesting analogy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The wood is still foating should I weigh it down or will it still sink like that.?
 

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You can also suggest not boiling for the opposite reasons. It takes away that nice natural tint to the water and kills all the yummies my fish like;)
 

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The tannis does help to lower pH, so if you want more acidic water only boil it for a short time, if you don`t want your pH to change very much, boil that sucker until the water is coming out clear!
 
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